US Senate candidate John Fetterman talks one-on-one with News 8 about economy, crime, his health

The general election is next week, and News 8 is talking with Pennsylvania’s Democratic U.S. Senate candidate John Fetterman one-on-one for the first time since the primary.After his stroke, Fetterman hadn’t been giving interviews to Pennsylvania reporters until now.He and Barbara Barr discussed a number of issues.His health, the debate with Mehmet OzBarbara Barr: “You had your doctor send a note about some of your medical records. Would you consider releasing a full medical record list?”John Fetterman: “I feel like having all the doctors on my team all believe that I’m fit to serve. I’ve tried to be very transparent about going and meeting thousands and thousands of voters all across Pennsylvania. I always knew that the debate was going to be challenging, given the recovery from a stroke, and I showed up. So, I do believe that I’m fit to serve, as well as so does my doctors.”Barr: “Did you ever consider stepping aside?”Fetterman: “No, of course not. Of course not.”Women’s health careIf elected, Fetterman said he would vote to codify Roe v. Wade.CrimeRepublicans have been focused on crime and Fetterman’s crusade to grant pardons for some convicts in his role heading up the Board of Pardons.Barr: “Do you feel you’ve been maybe too sympathetic toward folks who committed crimes and are in prison – giving them a second chance – and not as empathetic to victims and their families?”Fetterman: “I’m the only candidate in this race that actually has a record of fighting against crime. As mayor of my community (Braddock), with a community that had a very significant gun violence issue, and that’s the reason why I ran for mayor in the first place. And I was successful to partner with the police, to fund the police and to plan one that is also working with the community. And we were successful.”Fetterman has sought and helped achieve clemency for a number of convicted murderers he says no longer pose a threat to public safety.But he was the lone vote on other cases that fellow board members – including Democratic gubernatorial candidate Josh Shapiro – rejected for pardons.Barr: “Would you do any of those votes differently?”Fetterman: “Again, I’m proud to run on my record on actually fighting gun violence and crime during my time as mayor.”EconomyBarr: “President Biden has had a number of bills that you say you’ve supported. Have Democrats spent too much, creating some record high inflation?”Fetterman: “Those were spent to actually support working families all across Pennsylvania and across America. Trillions seem to be a problem when it’s going to support working people. When you have trillions given for the gigantic Republican corporate tax cuts, and I think it’s also important that we push back against a lot of the corporate greed.”Energy policyIn a 2018 interview, Fetterman said he was opposed to fracking.Barr: “Can you talk about your current position on fracking and how it may have changed from a couple of years ago?”Fetterman: “I do think energy independence is really critical here in Pennsylvania and in America. And I am a very strong supporter of fracking. Some of the questions that I had years ago were really just completely rooted in some environmental concerns. Since Pennsylvania ended up to pass very strong kinds of regulations, and now that makes supporting fracking very much a no-brainer.”Previous interviews Go here to watch previous interviews with Fetterman and Republican opponent Mehmet Oz.

The general election is next week, and News 8 is talking with Pennsylvania’s Democratic U.S. Senate candidate John Fetterman one-on-one for the first time since the primary.

After his stroke, Fetterman hadn’t been giving interviews to Pennsylvania reporters until now.

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He and Barbara Barr discussed a number of issues.

His health, the debate with Mehmet Oz

Barbara Barr: “You had your doctor send a note about some of your medical records. Would you consider releasing a full medical record list?”

John Fetterman: “I feel like having all the doctors on my team all believe that I’m fit to serve. I’ve tried to be very transparent about going and meeting thousands and thousands of voters all across Pennsylvania. I always knew that the debate was going to be challenging, given the recovery from a stroke, and I showed up. So, I do believe that I’m fit to serve, as well as so does my doctors.”

Barr: “Did you ever consider stepping aside?”

Fetterman: “No, of course not. Of course not.”

Women’s health care

If elected, Fetterman said he would vote to codify Roe v. Wade.

Crime

Republicans have been focused on crime and Fetterman’s crusade to grant pardons for some convicts in his role heading up the Board of Pardons.

Barr: “Do you feel you’ve been maybe too sympathetic toward folks who committed crimes and are in prison – giving them a second chance – and not as empathetic to victims and their families?”

Fetterman: “I’m the only candidate in this race that actually has a record of fighting against crime. As mayor of my community (Braddock), with a community that had a very significant gun violence issue, and that’s the reason why I ran for mayor in the first place. And I was successful to partner with the police, to fund the police and to plan one that is also working with the community. And we were successful.”

Fetterman has sought and helped achieve clemency for a number of convicted murderers he says no longer pose a threat to public safety.

But he was the lone vote on other cases that fellow board members – including Democratic gubernatorial candidate Josh Shapiro – rejected for pardons.

Barr: “Would you do any of those votes differently?”

Fetterman: “Again, I’m proud to run on my record on actually fighting gun violence and crime during my time as mayor.”

Economy

Barr: “President Biden has had a number of bills that you say you’ve supported. Have Democrats spent too much, creating some record high inflation?”

Fetterman: “Those were spent to actually support working families all across Pennsylvania and across America. Trillions seem to be a problem when it’s going to support working people. When you have trillions given for the gigantic Republican corporate tax cuts, and I think it’s also important that we push back against a lot of the corporate greed.”

Energy policy

In a 2018 interview, Fetterman said he was opposed to fracking.

Barr: “Can you talk about your current position on fracking and how it may have changed from a couple of years ago?”

Fetterman: “I do think energy independence is really critical here in Pennsylvania and in America. And I am a very strong supporter of fracking. Some of the questions that I had years ago were really just completely rooted in some environmental concerns. Since Pennsylvania ended up to pass very strong kinds of regulations, and now that makes supporting fracking very much a no-brainer.”

Previous interviews

Go here to watch previous interviews with Fetterman and Republican opponent Mehmet Oz.

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